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"There is a theory which states that is ever anyone discovers exactly what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable.

There is another theory which states that this has already happened.”
-Douglas Adams

Blogs I follow:

Theme by: Miguel
  1. Messier 83

This galaxy is located in the southern constellation Hydra (The Water-Snake) and is also known as NGC 5236; the distance is about 15 million light-years. 

    Messier 83

    This galaxy is located in the southern constellation Hydra (The Water-Snake) and is also known as NGC 5236; the distance is about 15 million light-years. 

  2. 5 Notes
  3. Messier 78

    Turn up your volume and press full screen. It’s worth it.

    (Source: eso.org)

  4. 14 Notes
  5. Crystal Ball Nebula

NGC 1514 is a planetary nebula that was discovered by William Herschel on November 13th, 1790, describing it “A most singular phaenomenon” and forcing him to rethink his ideas on the construction of the heavens. Up until this point Herschel was convinced that all nebulae consisted of masses of stars too remote to resolve, but now here was a single star “surrounded with a faintly luminous atmosphere.”

He went on to conclude “Our judgement I may venture to say, will be, that the nebulosity about the star is not of a starry nature”. It has since been conjectured that the nebula in fact envelops a tightly orbiting double star with a period of up to 10 days. Gas is presumably expanding away from the larger star of the pair.

Copyright: Leonardo Orazi

    Crystal Ball Nebula

    NGC 1514 is a planetary nebula that was discovered by William Herschel on November 13th, 1790, describing it “A most singular phaenomenon” and forcing him to rethink his ideas on the construction of the heavens. Up until this point Herschel was convinced that all nebulae consisted of masses of stars too remote to resolve, but now here was a single star “surrounded with a faintly luminous atmosphere.”

    He went on to conclude “Our judgement I may venture to say, will be, that the nebulosity about the star is not of a starry nature”. It has since been conjectured that the nebula in fact envelops a tightly orbiting double star with a period of up to 10 days. Gas is presumably expanding away from the larger star of the pair.

    Copyright: Leonardo Orazi

    (Source: afro-dominicano)

  6. 225 Notes
    Reblogged: scinerds
  7. NGC 2024-Flame Nebula

The bright bluish star towards the right is one of the three bright stars forming the Belt of Orion

    NGC 2024-Flame Nebula

    The bright bluish star towards the right is one of the three bright stars forming the Belt of Orion

  8. 37 Notes
  9. Milky Way Panorama

    Milky Way Panorama

  10. 8 Notes
  11. Dust Sculptures in the Rosette Nebula

What creates the cosmic dust sculptures in the Rosette Nebula? Noted for the common beauty of its overall shape, parts of the Rosette Nebula, also known as NGC 2237, show beauty even when viewed up close. Visible above are globules of dark dust and gas that are slowly being eroded away by the energetic light and winds by nearby massive stars.

Credit & Copyright: John Ebersole

    Dust Sculptures in the Rosette Nebula

    What creates the cosmic dust sculptures in the Rosette Nebula? Noted for the common beauty of its overall shape, parts of the Rosette Nebula, also known as NGC 2237, show beauty even when viewed up close. Visible above are globules of dark dust and gas that are slowly being eroded away by the energetic light and winds by nearby massive stars.

    Credit & Copyright: John Ebersole

    (Source: afro-dominicano)

  12. 205 Notes
    Reblogged: scinerds
  13. Protostellar

NGC 7538 - The Home of The Largest Known Protostar

A protostar is a large mass that forms by contraction out of the gas of a giant molecular cloud in the interstellar medium. The protostellar phase is an early stage in the process of star formation. —Susan Hewitt

Image & Processing Copyright: Emil Ivanov

    Protostellar

    NGC 7538 - The Home of The Largest Known Protostar

    A protostar is a large mass that forms by contraction out of the gas of a giant molecular cloud in the interstellar medium. The protostellar phase is an early stage in the process of star formation. —Susan Hewitt

    Image & Processing Copyright: Emil Ivanov

    (Source: afro-dominicano)

  14. 363 Notes
    Reblogged: scinerds
  15. DWB 111: The Propeller Nebula

Copyright: Adam Jesionkiewicz

    DWB 111: The Propeller Nebula

    Copyright: Adam Jesionkiewicz

    (Source: afro-dominicano)

  16. 126 Notes
    Reblogged: scinerds
  17. The galactic Center

Copyright: Lorenzo Comolli, Luigi Fontana, Giosuè Ghioldi, Emmanuele Sordini

Processing: Lorenzo Comolli
  18. 553 Notes
    Reblogged: scinerds
  19. Cygnus X

In The Heart Of Cygnus, NASA’s Fermi Reveals A Cosmic-ray Cocoon

Cygnus X hosts many young stellar groupings, including the OB2 and OB9 associations and the cluster NGC 6910. The combined outflows and ultraviolet radiation from the region’s numerous massive stars have heated and pushed gas away from the clusters, producing cavities of hot, lower-density gas. In this 8-micron infrared image, ridges of denser gas mark the boundaries of the cavities. Bright spots within these ridges show where stars are forming today.

Copyright: NASA/IPAC/MSX

    Cygnus X

    In The Heart Of Cygnus, NASA’s Fermi Reveals A Cosmic-ray Cocoon

    Cygnus X hosts many young stellar groupings, including the OB2 and OB9 associations and the cluster NGC 6910. The combined outflows and ultraviolet radiation from the region’s numerous massive stars have heated and pushed gas away from the clusters, producing cavities of hot, lower-density gas. In this 8-micron infrared image, ridges of denser gas mark the boundaries of the cavities. Bright spots within these ridges show where stars are forming today.

    Copyright: NASA/IPAC/MSX

    (Source: afro-dominicano)

  20. 100 Notes
    Reblogged: scinerds
  21. NGC 891

by Fabrizio Francione
  22. 82 Notes
    Reblogged: scinerds
  23. M45 Star and Stripes

Copyright: Marco Angelini and Fabio Tagliani (acquisition); Francesco Antonucci (processing)
  24. 113 Notes
    Reblogged: scinerds
  25. Hubble’s Variable Nebula - NGC 2261

The fan-shaped reflection nebula is made up of dust particles that relfect and scatter mostly blue light from the nearby star R Monocerotis, located in the tip of the nebula at bottom. The shape of the nebula varies over short time periods, believed to be caused by moving opaque clouds of dust and gas between the star and the nebula.

Copyright 2011 Jerry Lodriguss

    Hubble’s Variable Nebula - NGC 2261

    The fan-shaped reflection nebula is made up of dust particles that relfect and scatter mostly blue light from the nearby star R Monocerotis, located in the tip of the nebula at bottom. The shape of the nebula varies over short time periods, believed to be caused by moving opaque clouds of dust and gas between the star and the nebula.

    Copyright 2011 Jerry Lodriguss

    (Source: afro-dominicano)

  26. 59 Notes
    Reblogged: scinerds
  27. cwnl:

How to See the Stars on the Longest Winter Nights

We are now only a few weeks away from the winter solstice Dec. 22. Anyone who lives in northern latitudes might have noticed how late the sun is rising and how early the sun is setting lately, especially since the end of Daylight Saving Time earlier this month.

Most people think of the winter solstice as the shortest day of the year, but stargazers tend to see it as the longest night of the year. On this date, the sun is above the horizon roughly 9 hours, varying with latitude. Subtracting twilight, the night is fully dark for almost 12 hours.

One result of this long night, combined with the southern position of the sun, is that a very large part of the night sky can be seen in one night. As evening twilight ends, the autumn constellations Cygnus, Pegasus and Aquarius fill the sky.

Then, as morning twilight begins, the spring constellations are visible: Hercules, Boötes, and Virgo. About the only constellations not visible at some point during the night are the ones very close to the sun, such as Ophiuchus, Sagittarius and Scorpius.

Continue: Long December Nights..

    cwnl:

    How to See the Stars on the Longest Winter Nights

    We are now only a few weeks away from the winter solstice Dec. 22. Anyone who lives in northern latitudes might have noticed how late the sun is rising and how early the sun is setting lately, especially since the end of Daylight Saving Time earlier this month.

    Most people think of the winter solstice as the shortest day of the year, but stargazers tend to see it as the longest night of the year. On this date, the sun is above the horizon roughly 9 hours, varying with latitude. Subtracting twilight, the night is fully dark for almost 12 hours.

    One result of this long night, combined with the southern position of the sun, is that a very large part of the night sky can be seen in one night. As evening twilight ends, the autumn constellations Cygnus, Pegasus and Aquarius fill the sky.

    Then, as morning twilight begins, the spring constellations are visible: Hercules, Boötes, and Virgo. About the only constellations not visible at some point during the night are the ones very close to the sun, such as Ophiuchus, Sagittarius and Scorpius.

    Continue: Long December Nights..

  28. 70 Notes
    Reblogged: scinerds
  29. 
Panoramic view of the WR 22 and Eta Carinae regions of the Carina Nebula

    Panoramic view of the WR 22 and Eta Carinae regions of the Carina Nebula

  30. 31 Notes